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WFP Begins Series Of Air Drops To Deliver Food To Refugees In South Sudan

“The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) carried out the first in a series of air drops to replenish rapidly diminishing food stocks for more than 100,000 people in South Sudan who have fled fighting in Sudan,” the U.N. News Centre reports (8/15). “The refugees are severely malnourished going for days without supplies after being driven from their homes by the violence,” Examiner.com notes (Lambers, 8/15). “The first air drops were made Wednesday in Maban County in Upper Nile state,” the Associated Press/Washington Post writes, adding that camps there — “along with another in the region called Yida — have received more than 160,000 refugees who have fled war on the other side of the border in Sudan.” According to the AP, “WFP plans to deliver up to 2,000 metric tons of food to Maban over the coming days and weeks” (8/16).

Nearly Half Of Lesotho Population Faces Food Insecurity In Coming Months, Prime Minister Warns

“Years of bad luck and record-breaking maize prices have led land-locked Lesotho into a crisis,” the Devex “Development Newswire” reports. “Prime Minister Tom Thabane declared a food security emergency on August 10, and a national vulnerability assessment warns that nearly 45 percent of the nation’s 2.2 million people will face moderate to severe food insecurity in the next few months,” the news service writes, adding, “While the crisis can be mitigated in the short term, Lesotho will need ongoing food support: It’s one of four countries in the world where nearly 100 percent of the population is projected to remain food insecure for the next ten years.”

Aid Organizations To Form Network To Facilitate Delivery Of Medical, Food Supplies In Syria

Delegates from humanitarian aid groups from the Arab and Muslim world at a conference in Cairo on Sunday urged international aid agencies to utilize Syrian civil society and private sector groups to deliver medical and food aid inside the country, where anti-government protests have displaced hundreds of thousands and pushed many below the poverty line, IRIN reports. “Access was among the main points of discussion at the meeting, hosted by the Arab League, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and The Humanitarian Forum, which called for better coordination in the delivery of aid both inside Syria and to refugees in neighboring countries, especially in the area of access to health care,” the news service writes.

More Than 1M Children Under Age 5 At Risk Of Malnutrition In Sahel, UNICEF Warns

“The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is warning that more than a million children below the age of five in the Sahel are facing a disaster amid the ongoing food crisis in the drought-prone region of Africa,” the U.N. News Centre reports (3/16). “‘More extreme conditions could see this number rise to about 1.5 million and the problem is that funding is not coming in at the rate that we need in order to prepare properly,’ [UNICEF spokesperson Marixie Mercado] said. ‘So far we have received just one-fifth of the $119 million we have asked for in 2012,’” VOA News writes (3/16).

Efforts Must Continue To Bring Clean Water, Sanitation, Food To The World

In a post on Science Blogs’ “The Pump Handle,” Liz Borkowski, a research associate at the George Washington University School of Public Health’s Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, recognizes World Water Day, discusses the importance of access to clean water and sanitation facilities, and writes, “This World Water Day is both a celebration of an achievement and a reminder that we still have a long way to go before everyone has the water, sanitation, and food needed to live healthy lives” (3/22).

‘The Hunger Games’ Film Could Raise Awareness About Hunger

In this post in State Department’s “DipNote” blog, Paul Weisenfeld, assistant to the administrator of the USAID Bureau of Food Security, writes of the new film “The Hunger Games,” “I was struck by how much the premise relates to the very heart of what we are trying to address at USAID and through Feed the Future.” He continues, “Among other themes, the book touches on the fundamental right everyone should have: access to food,” and concludes that the movie is “an entry point for discussion and engagement on a very real issue based on an incredible pop culture success. If it gets people talking about hunger, the need for political will and access to resources, the consequences of inaction, and the transformative power of our collective commitment, that — for me — is a success beyond any box office record the film might set” (3/22).

Clinton Announces U.S. Water Partnership To Address Global Water Challenges

Speaking at State Department headquarters in recognition of World Water Day on Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton “announced a new partnership of organizations to apply the nation’s abundant experience in water issues to solving global water challenges,” according to IIP Digital. “The partnership will bring together more than 30 agencies, institutions and advocacy organizations with diverse experience and knowledge of water issues,” the news service writes (Porter, 3/22). The U.S. Water Partnership will “creat[e] a platform for fostering new partnerships among the U.S.-based private sector and the non-profit, academic, scientific, and expert communities” and “will mobilize the ‘Best-of-America’ to provide safe drinking water and sanitation and improve water resources management worldwide,” according to a State Department press release (3/22). “Something as simple as better access to water and sanitation can improve the quality of life and reduce the disease burden for billions of people,” Clinton said, VOA News notes (3/22).

World Water Day Resources Available From USAID, ‘DataBlog’

USAID’s water team on Thursday, World Water Day, published a new edition of their Global Waters Magazine to recognize the day, according to USAID’s IMPACTblog. The issue is available as an e-zine or a downloadable file (3/22). Also on Thursday, the Guardian’s “DataBlog” published graphics depicting the latest data from UNICEF and the WHO, which “show targets for safe drinking water are being met ahead of time” (Evans, 3/22).

U.S. Envoy For N. Korea Says Administrative Concerns Over Food Aid Resolved, Would Not Provide Details, AP Reports

Robert King, the U.S. special envoy for North Korean human rights issues, on Thursday said talks with North Korean officials over food aid had “resolved the administrative issues we were concerned with,” although “[h]e declined to disclose details before reporting back to Washington,” the Associated Press reports. “The talks follow a deal announced last week in which the U.S. offered 240,000 tons of food aid in return for North Korea freezing long-range missile and nuclear tests and for halting a uranium enrichment program that would be monitored by U.N. inspectors,” the news agency writes. “The U.S. … wanted to ensure that the assistance reaches North Koreans who need it, rather than being diverted to the military or other groups as was suspected with some previous international aid shipments,” and while King “said that those concerns about the shipments had been resolved, … he did not discuss how deliveries would be monitored,” according to the AP (3/8).

FAO Calls For Nearly $70M In Additional Aid For Sahel Households Threatened By Drought

The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) “on Friday appealed for an extra $69.8 million to aid 790,000 vulnerable households in the drought-hit Sahel region in West Africa,” Agence France-Presse/Vanguard reports (3/10). “In a news release, the [FAO] said that at least 15 million people are estimated to be at risk of food insecurity in countries in the Sahel, including 5.4 million people in Niger, three million in Mali, 1.7 million in Burkina Faso and 3.6 million in Chad, as well as hundreds of thousands in Senegal, the Gambia, and Mauritania,” the U.N. News Centre writes (3/9). FAO Director-General Jose Graziano da Silva said, “We need to act to prevent further deterioration of the food security situation and to avoid a full-scale food and nutrition crisis,” according to AFP (3/10).