Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues…

Trending on kff King v. Burwell Medicaid Expansion Health Spending

Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy ReportClinical Research/R&D Search Results « » The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Clinical Research/R&D

  • your selections
Clear Search

Filter Results

date

Tags

  • results
Addressing Growing Challenge Of Counterfeit Drugs In Developing World

“Many innovative solutions are being proposed to help tackle the spread of counterfeit drugs in developing countries,” GlobalVoices reports. The blog includes highlights from several news articles and blog posts on the topic, including a number of solutions used to identify such drugs. The blog also includes a link to a TEDxBoston talk by Ashifi Gogo, an entrepreneur from Ghana, in which he “explains how his solution works by combining cell phones, community, and the cooperation of governments and pharmaceutical companies” (Rakotomalala, 8/30).

Mauritian Official Warns Of Counterfeit Medicine Dangers

Speaking Wednesday at a seminar titled “Campaign Against Counterfeit Medicines,” Mauritian Health and Quality of Life Minister Lormus Bundhoo “cautioned against the dangers posed by counterfeit drugs and their impact on human life” and “said that the authorities are determined to raise awareness on the dangers of the manufacture of and trade in counterfeit medicines, and the importance of combating counterfeit medicines in Mauritius,” PANA/Afriquejet reports. “The minister recalled that Mauritius had set up a National Pharmacovigilance Committee for drug surveillance and drug use in the public and private sectors since December 2011,” the news service writes, noting, “So far, there has been no evidence of counterfeit drugs in Mauritius, he stressed.” The news service provides some statistics about counterfeit drugs worldwide that were cited by Charges d’Affaires Troy Fitrell of the U.S. Embassy in Port-Louis, who also spoke at the event (8/29).

India's Contribution To Global Health R&D Needs Domestic, International Support

As the BRIC countries — Brazil, Russia, India, and China — invest more in innovations in health technologies and other areas, “many are looking to these countries to correct the global health research and development (R&D) imbalance that leaves the poor without needed products such as an improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccine or tests to help diagnose patients in remote rural settings,” David de Ferranti, president of Results for Development Institute (R4D), writes in the Huffington Post Blog. Writing that “India, which has already played such an important role in manufacturing affordable antiretroviral drugs, vaccines, and other essential health commodities for developing countries,” de Ferranti asks whether India “is … ready to play a leading role in health R&D?”

Voters Need More Information On Free Trade Agreement That Could Impact Drug Prices

In an opinion piece in the Guardian’s “Comment is Free” blog, Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, discusses potential policies contained within the “Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), a pact that the United States is negotiating with Australia, Canada, Japan and eight other countries in the Pacific region.” However, “[a]t this point, it’s not really possible to discuss the merits of the TPP since the governments are keeping the proposed text a secret from the public,” he says. Noting “[a] few items that have been leaked give us some insight as to the direction of this pact,” he discusses how the “pharmaceutical industry is … likely to be a big gainer” from the TPP if the pact includes “stronger and longer patent protection and also increased use of ‘data exclusivity.'”

Small, Ingestible Sensor Can Track Patient Medication Intake, Activity Levels; Technology To Be Tested For TB Treatment

The FDA last month approved for use a small ingestible sensor that, when embedded into a pill, can help “keep track of whether a patient is taking their medicine on time,” Reuters reports. “The digital feedback technology, devised by Redwood City, California-based Proteus Digital Health Inc., can also prompt patients to take their medicine and even ask them to take a walk if they have been inactive for too long,” the news service writes. “Proteus has a partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention to test the technology in tuberculosis treatment,” Reuters notes, adding, “Pills for anything from the common cold to diabetes or cancer can be embedded.”

Blog Calls On Presidential Candidates To Discuss Global Health R&D

Noting “Mitt Romney will become the official nominee for the Republican Party at its convention in Florida” this week, Kim Lufkin, communications officer for the Global Health Technologies Coalition, writes in this post in the coalition’s “Breakthroughs” blog, “Science and research will likely not appear on the agenda, as Romney, expected Vice Presidential candidate Paul Ryan, and others will instead focus on topics like reducing federal spending.” She continues, “It’s unfortunate that research will not be a part of the conversation, as new predictions coming out this week indicate that if Romney and Ryan win the election in November, changes could be coming for health research and efforts to develop much-needed new tools for global health.” She concludes, “It’s important that the candidates — from Obama and Vice President Biden to Romney and Ryan — start talking about these issues head-on,” and “no matter which party takes the White House in November, support for global health [research and development (R&D)] must continue” (8/24).

Interview Examines Issues Surrounding Collaborative R&D To Advance Health Technologies

In this post in the Results for Development Institute’s “Center for Global Health R&D Policy Assessment” blog, Hassan Masum, a consultant at the institute, interviews Alph Bingham, co-founder of Innocentive, an online platform for crowdsourcing technical solutions, about issues surrounding collaborative research and development (R&D) to advance health technologies. According to the blog, the interview is part of a series examining “how collaborative R&D can advance health technologies, and how its success can be gauged” (8/23).

Proposed U.S. Legislation Would 'Set The Standard' For Global Efforts To Combat Counterfeit Drugs

In this Forbes opinion piece, John Lechleiter, president and chief executive officer of Eli Lilly and Company, examines the business of counterfeit medicines, writing, “With global sales last year estimated as high as $200 billion, counterfeit medicine is big business, and it’s growing.” “In a recent Forbes column, Henry I. Miller cited an estimate by Roger Bate of the American Enterprise Institute that more than 100,000 people die every year from counterfeit drugs,” he continues, adding, “That’s why fighting counterfeits is essential to safeguarding health. We need action — national and international — to better secure the pharmaceutical supply chain.”

National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Announces HIV Vaccine Initiative Awards

“Researchers at 14 institutions will explore new approaches to designing a vaccine against HIV with awards that are part of an anticipated four-year, $34.8 million initiative, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] announced [Tuesday],” the Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog reports. “The awards reflect directions suggested by previous research, as well as the need to explore new avenues toward a vaccine, NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci told Science Speaks,” the blog writes. “‘There are some remaining important facts that we don’t know about HIV,’ Fauci said,” adding, “There are many fundamental questions that remain unanswered,” according to the blog. “The awards are intended to allow researchers to ask those questions, he said,” the blog notes (Barton, 8/21).

VOA Examines New Tests To Rapidly Identify Counterfeit Medications

“Counterfeit medications are a serious and sometimes deadly problem in developing countries,” but “two teams of U.S.-based scientists have developed quick tests can identify counterfeit drugs before they can cause harm,” VOA News reports. Toni Barstis, a chemist at Saint Mary’s College in Indiana, and a team of researchers “presented the new testing methods this week at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia,” the news service writes, noting, “Scientists hope their efforts can help prevent the thousands of deaths caused by fake medicines every year.”