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Global Malaria Control Funding Has Gone Up Significantly Since 2007, But Funding Shortfall Remains, Study Says

Global malaria funding has gone up by 166 percent since 2007, but total funding is still 60 percent short of the $4.9 billion required for comprehensive malaria control this year, according to a study published in the journal Lancet on Saturday, Agence France-Presse reports. Malaria control financing has risen from $730 million in 2007 to $1.94 billion this year, according to the analysis (10/2).

USAID Administrator Outlines Feed The Future Initiative At World Food Prize Symposium

USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah on Friday in Iowa “described the Obama administration’s international agricultural development effort, Feed the Future, as a flagship effort for” his agency and “a key plank in the administration’s global development strategy, but said it can’t succeed without more support,” CongressDaily reports (Hagstrom, 10/18).

Also In Global Health News: Flooding, HIV Treatment Adherence, and Economic Growth In Africa; China Detects Superbug; U.S. Aid To Myanmar; Cash-Transfer Programs

1.8M Now Affected By Flooding In West And Central Africa; Hardest Hit-Benin Struggles With Disease, Damaged Health Centers Flooding continues to devastate Central and West Africa – more than 1.8 million people have been affected and 400 killed, according to the U.N., United Press International reports. “The nation of Benin has…

Dengue Fever Spreads In Asia, WHO Warns 2.5B People At Risk

The World Health Organization (WHO) “has warned that 2.5 billion people are at risk” of dengue fever, “which has ‘grown dramatically in recent decades,” Agence France-Presse reports. WHO officials cite higher temperatures, growing populations and international travel for the “rapid rise in urban mosquito populations” and rise in dengue. Seventy percent of the at-risk population is in Asia, the WHO said.

Experts Highlight Health Issues In Growing Megacities

Experts at the World Health Summit highlighted health concerns related to the growth of megacities, “roughly defined as cities with a population of more than 10 million,” Agence France-Presse reports.

Officials Discuss Leadership, Donor Commitments, Eliminating Leprosy At Start Of WHO Western Pacific Region Committee Session

The WHO “must demonstrate strong leadership backed by impeccable technical competency, [Malaysian] Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak said” at the opening ceremony of the 61st Session of the WHO Regional Committee for the Western Pacific Monday, Bernama reports. “I believe this important conference can provide the input for future global action against pandemics and other trans-boundary diseases affecting all countries and communities, especially developing countries,” he said.

Asian Development Bank Conference Addresses Water, Sanitation Concerns

Water shortages that could reduce food production and worsen economic conditions in Asia are worsening, Arjun Thapan, an infrastructure advisor with the Asian Development Bank (ADB), said on Tuesday at the ADB’s “Water: Crisis and Choices” conference in Manila, Philippines, Agence France-Presse reports.

Also In Global Health News: Tropical Storm Damage In Central America; Global Health Corps; Hunger In S. Sudan; Tobacco Use In China; Improving Water Conditions In Asia

Tropical Storm Agatha Hits Central America Tropical storm Agatha pounded Central America over the weekend, bringing heavy rain that killed at least 179 people, mostly in Guatemala, the New York Times reports. The search for survivors continues as rescue workers dig through the thousands of homes and buildings that collapsed.…

Most Of World’s 13M Preterm Births Occur In Africa, Asia

The “vast majority” of the world’s 13 million preterm births each year occur in developing countries where the babies’ “chances of survivals are low,” according to an article published Monday in the January issue of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Reuters/ABCNews reports. The findings are based on research conducted between the mid-1990s and 2007.