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Non-Profit Consortium, USAID Announce New Agreement Focusing On African Food Security

The non-profit Partners in Food Solutions (PFS), a consortium of General Mills, Cargill and DSM, on Thursday announced a new agreement with USAID that “will enable PFS to expand the reach of the technical and business expertise it provides to small and growing food processors in sub-Saharan Africa,” according to a PFS press release. Under the new agreement, which “builds on a public-private partnership between USAID, the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and General Mills, formed in 2010,” Solutions to African Food Enterprises (SAFE), USAID and PFS “will deepen their collaboration to improve African food security by bringing expertise, knowledge and resources to the continent’s food processing sector,” the press release states (10/18).

Blog Reports On ID Week In San Diego

The Center for Global Health Policy’s “Science Speaks” blog on Friday published two posts reporting on ID Week, which concluded in San Diego on Sunday. “Wafaa El-Sadr of Columbia University offered an ID Week presentation Thursday about the impact of treatment on the global epidemic and the new promise of changing the trajectory of the epidemic by scaling up treatment both to save lives and reduce HIV incidence,” the blog writes in the first post, adding, “She reminded her audience that treatment has already had a major impact” (Lubinski, 10/19). “A trio of presentations on HIV, Women and Child Health [on Friday] morning told a story of success in preventing transmission of HIV from parents to children in the United States that has yet to be duplicated in developing countries, of options that could make a difference, and, in a look at the burdens children born with HIV will carry into adulthood, of some of the relatively rarely discussed consequences of gaps in efforts so far,” the blog writes in a second post (Barton, 10/19).

U.N. Official Calls Food Shortages In Southern Africa 'A Chronic Problem'

U.N. Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Catherine Bragg on Saturday said food shortages are “a chronic problem” in southern Africa, “where more than 5.5 million people in eight countries need aid this year, a 40 percent increase compared to 2011,” according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Associated Press reports. Ending a five-day trip to the region, “Bragg … said worsening food shortages are the result of drought or floods and rising world food prices,” according to the AP (10/20). Bragg met with officials in Zimbabwe, Botswana, and South Africa to discuss increased cooperation and preparedness, the U.N. News Centre reports, noting Malawi, Lesotho, and Swaziland also are affected by chronic food shortages, according to OCHA (10/19).

ECOWAS, Germany, FAO Launch Hunger-Free Initiative For West Africa

“A new project with the objective of eliminating hunger in West Africa has been launched by West African countries, Germany, and the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO),” BusinessDay reports (10/20). The three-year Hunger-Free Initiative for West Africa will “support the 15 ECOWAS members to increase commitment and collaboration among key decision makers of all sectors,” which “is expected to translate into increased budgets allocations to food and nutrition security as well as private investment to combat poverty, the [FAO] said in a news release,” the U.N. News Centre writes (10/18). “Germany is providing $2.4 million to fund the project, while FAO is expected to provide technical support,” the Devex “Development Newswire” reports, adding, “ECOWAS also committed financial support and pledged to ensure active participation from its members.” According to the news service, “The project’s focus on increasing political commitment in West Africa echoes U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s call for strong political will and new technologies to eradicate hunger around the world” (Mungcal, 10/19).

U.N. SG Ban Says Hunger Fight Needs Political Will, Innovation At World Food Prize Ceremony

“Innovative approaches and technologies as well as a strong political will from countries are essential to combat hunger,” according to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who spoke Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, at an event to recognize the winner of the World Food Prize, the U.N. News Centre reports. This year’s winner, Israeli scientist Daniel Hillel, developed “a new mode of bringing water to crops i­­n arid and dry regions, known as ‘micro-irrigation,’” the news service notes. An end to hunger “calls for harnessing the creativity of scientists and economists,” Ban said, adding, “It requires developing new approaches and technologies to respond to climate change, water scarcity and desertification,” according to the news service (10/18). “There is enough food to feed seven billion people, but because of climatic conditions, because of supply, market price volatility, there are still 870 million people who are going to bed hungry every night,” Ban said, the Des Moines Register notes.

Researchers Concerned Over Likely Rise In Older People Living With HIV In Sub-Saharan Africa

“Sub-Saharan Africa is likely to see a more than 200 percent increase in the number of older people living with HIV in the next 30 years, thanks to improvements in life-saving treatment, experts said Thursday,” Agence France-Presse reports. “Three million people aged 50 or older currently live with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and that figure is expected to rise to 9.1 million by 2040,” the news service notes. “It’s mainly driven by the fact that people are being treated with antiretroviral drugs and therefore will survive to be old,” Robert Cumming of the Sydney School of Public Health at the University of Sydney said at a conference on aging in Africa, according to AFP. Cumming added the problem is “being ignored,” and the news service writes, “Policy makers on the continent were also not acknowledging the growing age group which has doctors and others working in the field worried.”

Study Demonstrates Cancer Control Essential For Development Progress, Researcher Says

Using data from cancer registries worldwide, researchers from the International Agency for Cancer Research (IACR) found that 169.3 million years of healthy life were lost to cancer in 2008, according to a study published on Tuesday in the Lancet, HealthDay News reports. Using “a measure called disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) to assess not only the impact of fatal cancer, but also the effects of disabilities among cancer survivors,” the researchers also found men in Eastern Europe and women in sub-Saharan Africa had the largest cancer burden worldwide; increased access to treatment has not improved survival outcomes for several common cancers; and lower-income countries have higher average levels of premature death due to cancer, while higher-income countries have higher average levels of cancer-related disability and impairment, according to the news service. Study co-author Freddie Bray, deputy head of the IARC Cancer Information Section, said in a Lancet press release, “Our findings illustrate quite starkly how cancer is already a barrier to sustainable development in many of the poorest countries across the world and this will only be exacerbated in the coming years if cancer control is neglected,” the news service notes (10/15).

Public-Private Partnership Will Promote Handwashing To Help Reduce Child Mortality In Africa

Though the number of children dying of preventable and treatable diseases worldwide has dropped significantly since 1990, there is “realistic hope for much more” progress, particularly if “[i]mproved hygiene and sanitation … play a key role in the next stage,” Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, and Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, write in the Huffington Post’s “Global Motherhood” blog. Noting that “diarrhea and pneumonia are the two leading killers of children, accounting for almost 30 percent of under-five deaths globally,” they state, “Vaccines can help, but improved hygiene and sanitation are also vital, and therefore key to meeting the Millennium Development Goal of cutting the child mortality rate by at least two-thirds by 2015.”

U.S. Can Draw Lessons From PEPFAR Success To Address Epidemic In Black America

“Thirty years ago, the CDC reported the first cases of HIV/AIDS in New York and Los Angeles,” Foreign Policy In Focus columnist Kwei Quartey writes in the Huffington Post World Blog, noting, “Since the beginning of the epidemic, over 600,000 people have died of AIDS in the United States, and 1.2 million people are currently living with HIV.” He briefly recounts a history of the disease in both the U.S. and Africa, writing, “Initially thought to be a disease of gay white men, AIDS is now a global epidemic.” He continues, “Whatever its origins, HIV/AIDS became a severe epidemic in East Africa in the 1980s,” noting, “The initial response by African governments to the AIDS crisis was inadequate, and in some cases absent.”

U.N. Report Shows Francophone African Countries Lag Behind In AIDS Treatment; NGOs Call For Increased Funding

“Despite great progress within a short time, the 29 French-speaking countries of sub-Saharan Africa are lagging far behind other states in the region in the battle against HIV/AIDS and need a massive increase in international aid, according to a United Nations report” (.pdf) released Friday, the U.N. News Centre reports. The report — titled “Decision Point La Francophonie: No new HIV infections, no one denied treatment” and released at a meeting of the 56-member state International Organization of La Francophonie (IOF) in Kinsasha, Democratic Republic of Congo — said while antiretroviral treatment coverage in IOF countries increased rapidly between 2003 and 2011, resulting in a nearly 30 percent decline in AIDS-related deaths, “an estimated 970,000 people are still waiting to access life-saving HIV treatment in IOF countries, accounting for 14 percent of the global treatment gap,” according to the news service.