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Relief Groups Appeal For Aid To Tackle Worsening Food Crisis In West Africa

“Relief groups are stepping up their appeals for aid to tackle the worsening food crisis in West Africa, where more than 18 million people face hunger,” the Guardian reports. “Relief agencies have been sounding the alarm for months about the effects of drought on the Sahel — a region stretching from the Atlantic to the Red Sea,” the newspaper writes, adding, “The situation has been made worse by the knock-on effect of the Libyan uprising that has destabilized Mali” (Tran, 6/12). UNICEF “forecasts that, over the course of 2012, at least 1.1 million children would need to be treated and 5,200 specialist treatment centers will need to be established to cope with the crisis,” the U.N. News Centre notes (6/11).

African-Led Innovation 'Imperative' To Overcoming Health Issues On The Continent

In this post in the Guardian’s “Poverty Matters” blog, Carel IJsselmuiden, executive director of the Council on Health for Development Group, writes that “Africa must turn its health research into treatments for African people,” noting, “Despite large investments being made by donors in health products and delivery of health services, a large percentage of Africans still have limited access to sufficient and quality healthcare — especially in rural areas.” He notes that a “recent report, Investing in health for Africa — released by the World Health Organisation (WHO), World Bank and USAID to name a few of the partners — says average additional spending in sub-Saharan Africa of $21 to $36 could in 2015 alone save more than three million lives, 90 percent of which would be women and children.”

Recognizing George W. Bush's Contributions To Health In Africa

“Former president George W. Bush made great strides and contributions towards improving African health during his time in office, a legacy that he continues to carry with him today,” according to a post in Malaria No More’s “Malaria Policy Center” blog. The blog highlights a recent article published by the Dallas Morning News, which…

Newborn Babies Account For 40% Of Preventable Child Deaths, See Little Global Health Funding, Report Says

“Newborns now account for 40 percent of preventable child deaths worldwide, but only a tiny fraction of international aid targets newborns, according to” Save the Children’s new report on newborn survival, to be published in the medical journal Health Policy and Planning Tuesday, USA Today reports (Madhani, 6/11). “The world has achieved remarkable progress on reducing child deaths — from 12.4 million in 1990 to 7.6 million in 2010 — but that progress isn’t reaching newborn babies at the same pace, the report shows,” a Save the Children press release states (6/12).

International Community Should Focus On Resilience, Not Just Relief, In Response To Drought In Horn Of Africa

“Over the past year, 13.3 million people in Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia were thrown into crisis as a result of drought in the Horn of Africa, the worst in 60 years,” USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah writes in this Devex opinion piece. “Droughts cannot be prevented, but they can be predicted and mitigated thanks to investments in early warning systems, satellite technology and on-the-ground analysis,” he writes, adding, “By identifying those communities facing the gravest risks and strategically focusing our efforts, we can help them withstand crisis.”

Economic Community of West African States Launches Urgent Appeal For Aid To Africa's Sahel Region

“The Economic Community of West African States [ECOWAS] sent a distress call Tuesday to the international community declaring that more than six million people are at risk of hunger in the Sahel region of Africa, including more than a million children exposed to severe malnutrition,” CNN reports. “The distress call was issued at the end of a two-day, high-level meeting [in Lome, Togo] to address the issue of food security in the region, especially in Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Chad,” the news service adds.

ONE Releases 2012 DATA Report Looking At E.U. Commitments To Development, Africa

ONE released its 2012 DATA Report this week, the ONE Blog reports, noting that the report this year focuses on the European Union’s commitments to development and to Africa. The report “tracks the progress of the E.U. institutions and the 27 E.U. Member States towards their promised goals of collectively providing 0.7 percent of their Gross National Income towards development assistance by 2015,” and a pledge to provide half of all aid increases to Africa, the blog notes. “The DATA report finds that while progress towards the 0.7 percent goal is mixed, all are lagging on their Africa promises,” the blog writes (Gunzburg, 6/25). E.U. Commissioner for Development Andris Piebalgs welcomed the report in a statement, saying, “I share the view that, in order to meet the 0.7 percent of GNI dedicated to aid, political courage and leadership is required but I’m confident that European governments will not make savings on the back of the poor. As Commissioner for Development, I will continue to call on Member States to keep their promises” (6/25).

Pregnancy Complications Are Leading Killer Of Teenage Girls Worldwide, Save The Children Report Says

Pregnancy is the biggest killer of teenage girls worldwide, with one million girls annually dying, being injured, or contracting a disease because of pregnancy or childbirth, according to a report (.pdf) released Tuesday by Save the Children, the Daily Mail reports (6/26). “Save the Children also cited official data which revealed that nearly one million babies born to teenage mothers die each year before their first birthday,” Agence France-Presse writes. “Worldwide, one in five girls give birth before they turn 18, according to the report,” which also said that the risk of a 15-year-old dying in pregnancy or childbirth is five times higher than for a woman in her twenties, the news service notes.

Success In Fighting Malaria Helping To Fuel Africa's Economic Growth, Reuters Reports

Reuters examines how the fight against malaria in Africa is helping to fuel the continent’s economic growth. “The number of malaria deaths has fallen dramatically in the last decade due to increased aid spending on basic items such as insecticide-treated bed nets and drugs, the World Health Organization (WHO) says,” the news agency writes, noting that an experimental vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline is showing prospect. The news agency discusses the efforts of AngloGold Ashanti, the world’s third largest gold producer, to prevent and treat malaria among its workers, which “‘made economic sense because of the absenteeism and the cost of medication,’ said Steve Knowles, the head of AngloGold’s anti-malaria operations.”

Agence France-Presse Reports On Efforts To Eradicate Sleeping Sickness In Sub-Saharan Africa

Agence France-Presse reports on human African trypanosomiasis, “commonly known as sleeping sickness, which is transmitted by tsetse flies found in 36 sub-Saharan African countries,” writing, “Without treatment in four months to a year, ‘the parasite penetrates into the brain, causing serious neurological symptoms, until death,’ said Doctor Benedict Blaynay, head of neglected tropical diseases at French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi.” The news service highlights efforts to control the disease in Chad, noting, “For the people living in Chad’s rural communities, the strange symptoms of sleeping sickness have long been shrouded in superstition about witchcraft and demonic possession. But the World Health Organization says it is not a losing battle.”