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‘Ethical Issues Raised By PrEP Are Difficult, But Not Insurmountable': “The AIDS movement is at a pivotal point in history, where it will face scrutiny not only to demonstrate that interventions are cost-effective and equitably distributed, but also to balance resource demands with other global health imperatives, such as maternal/child…

World Marks Haiti Earthquake Anniversary

Wednesday marked the one-year anniversary since a massive earthquake struck Haiti, the Miami Herald reports. “At 4:53 p.m., Haiti fell silent. It was a rare quiet time – 35 seconds – for this boisterous city normally filled with the sounds of the almost one million people who live on the street,” the newspaper writes. “From New York, Washington and Miami to Port-au-Prince, Haitians set Jan. 12 aside to grieve, to pray and celebrate life. But among the prayer vigils, memorials and beating of drums, Haitians also looked ahead, envisioning a future that includes more hospitals and schools, clean water and homes. Many mourners questioned why it was taking so long for Haiti to rise up from its ashes,” according to the Miami Herald.

Lancet Series Examines Health Challenges In India

“Indians are growing richer, but they are also adopting unhealthy lifestyles that could take years off their lives and threaten economic growth,” according to an article published in Lancet Tuesday, Agence France-Presse reports (1/11).

Also In Global Health News: Sec. Clinton In Yemen; China’s Ability To Track Outbreaks; Global Health Interests Among Medical Residents; Children Of Sex Workers

During Surprise Stop In Yemen, Sec. Clinton To Highlight U.S. Commitment To Country’s Development U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton arrived in Yemen Tuesday “on a diplomatically sensitive mission to broaden America’s relationship with this impoverished Arab country, a haven for Al Qaeda that has nurtured several recent terror…

Lancet World Report Examines Health Risks Associated With Inaccurate TB Tests, WHO’s Upcoming Recommendations

With “scores of commercial serology tests for tuberculosis … being sold in high-burden countries,” the “WHO is due to release a negative policy recommendation – the first of its kind for the organisation” – after several reviews have “indicated poor performance of these tests,” Lancet World Report writes in a piece that documents the health risks associated with a growing number of inaccurate TB tests. However, “[m]anufacturers continue to claim that their tests are effective and fill a diagnostic niche, especially in sputum smear-negative patient groups,” the journal notes.

Male Circumcision Helps Reduce Rates Of HPV Transmission To Women, Study Finds

“Among HIV-negative sexual partners, male circumcision helps prevent the transmission of human papillomavirus [HPV] from men to women,” according to a study published online Thursday in the Lancet, HealthDay News/Bloomberg Businessweek reports. “However, circumcision offers only partial protection and partners must still practice safe sex, the researchers pointed out,” according to the news service (1/6).

Also In Global Health News: Vaccination Hampered In Cote d’Ivoire; TB And Lung Cancer; HIV Testing, Counseling In Zambia; Reducing Child, Maternal Mortality In Ghana; Male Circumcision Campaign In Kenya

Political Unrest Hampering Cote d’Ivoire’s Yellow Fever Vaccine Campaign “Unrest following Cote d’Ivoire’s presidential election is blocking a nationwide vaccination drive against yellow fever, a fatal mosquito-borne disease that is affecting people throughout the country,” IRIN reports. The immunization campaign – part of a global effort by WHO and UNICEF –…

Indian Government Rejects Abbott’s Patent Application For Second-Line ARV

India’s patent office “has rejected American drug maker Abbott Laboratories’ patent application for an HIV combination drug, allowing low-cost local drug makers to make and sell their generic versions in India and other countries where the medicine is not patented,” Economic Times reports (1/4). The drug under consideration was Abbott’s “Kaletra, which combines two antivirals, [lopinavir/ritonavir and] is one of the preferred second-line treatments to fight drug-resistant HIV, according to the World Health Organization, which recommends governments include it on their list of essential medicines,” Bloomberg/Businessweek writes (Narayan, 1/4).

Newsweek Reports On Growth Of Safety Net Programs In Developing Countries

“[A] recent study by the World Health Organization and the International Labor Organization identified 72 different ‘social pension’ plans around the world dedicated to the elderly, the ill, or the down and out,” Newsweek writes in an article exploring the growth in welfare programs around the world. “Most countries on the [WHO/ILO] list are developing nations once considered too destitute to help their poor and that, until recently, had little or no welfare coverage at all. … While fighting inequality and helping the neediest has long been on the docket of Third World leaders, most previous attempts have been sabotaged by inefficiency, corruption, and stagnant or dysfunctional economies,” the magazine writes. “Now roaring economies in Asia, Latin America, and even Africa, coupled with better-functioning governments and sound fiscal stewardship, have stretched the policy horizons for many nations that once lived from one crisis to the next,” according to Newsweek.